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Hansen's Diseases
Outlines the symptoms, testa/diagnosis, causes and risk factors and treatment of this diseases
Agoraphobia
All about Agoraphobia - Anxiety, Dyspnea, Stress, all are symptoms of treatable depression
Down Syndrome
Learn about this genetic disorder, the causes and medical treatment
DISEASES AND CONDITIONS NEWS  
Doctors not sure we all need routine skin cancer screening
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - There isn’t enough evidence yet to say whether routine full-body skin cancer screenings are safe or effective, according to U.S. guidelines aimed at preventing deaths from these malignancies. The conclusion, issued today by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), adds to an ongoing debate in the medical community about how to strike the right balance between catching dangerous tumors as early as possible and avoiding unnecessary tests and treatments that may result from catching too many harmless abnormalities. “At this time, the task force concluded that there is not enough evidence to know whether a full-body skin exam by a clinician reduces deaths from melanoma,” said Dr. Michael Pignone, a task force member and researcher at the Dell Medical School at the University of Texas at Austin.

Chicken scent offers hope for malaria prevention
<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/chicken-scent-offers-hope-malaria-prevention-scientists-140024268.html"><img src="http://l1.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/RLqgdNPFJkMzJlbrcVdh2w--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3NfbGVnbztmaT1maWxsO2g9ODY7cT03NTt3PTEzMA--/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/afp.com/Part-MVD-Mvd6538857-1-1-0.jpg" width="130" height="86" alt="Tests carried out in three villages in Ethiopia showed that families that slept beneath a chicken in a cage overnight were mosquito-free in the morning, while homes without indoor poultry were not" align="left" title="Tests carried out in three villages in Ethiopia showed that families that slept beneath a chicken in a cage overnight were mosquito-free in the morning, while homes without indoor poultry were not" border="0" /></a>Ethiopian scientists have discovered mosquitoes are repulsed by the smell of chicken, raising hopes for the development of a novel way to prevent a disease that kills hundreds of thousands every year. A team of insect experts led by Professor Habte Tekie at the University of Addis Ababa began their investigation after noticing that mosquitoes bite humans and other animals but stay away from chickens. &quot;We went into the chemical basis involved in repelling malaria mosquitoes by odours emanating from the chickens... The results show that compounds from chicken have very good potential as repellent,&quot; Tekie told AFP.</p><br clear="all"/>

Specialist sees Pokémon Go as means of tackling type 2 diabetes
<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/specialist-sees-pok-mon-means-tackling-type-2-134728709.html"><img src="http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/lb0DB2rKFZDIIvG6.qmVmg--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3NfbGVnbztmaT1maWxsO2g9ODY7cT03NTt3PTEzMA--/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/US-AFPRelax/000_dd0su.b0743104639.original.jpg" width="130" height="86" alt="According to Dr Tom Yates, &quot;this game could be an innovative solution for rising obesity levels.&quot;" align="left" title="According to Dr Tom Yates, &quot;this game could be an innovative solution for rising obesity levels.&quot;" border="0" /></a>The smartphone-based character-hunting craze that&#039;s sweeping the world has caught the attention of a researcher at the University of Leicester, UK, specializing in international diabetes research. In fact, Dr Tom Yates sees the application as a potential means of tackling sedentary lifestyles and obesity, which can lead to type 2 diabetes. The augmented reality mobile game has so far been downloaded 75 million times worldwide, and sees users chase Pokémon characters through the streets.</p><br clear="all"/>

Scientist-developed compound brings hope of new epilepsy treatment
<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/scientist-developed-compound-brings-hope-epilepsy-treatment-095128442.html"><img src="http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/Te6CvI2DQ4az7BJJABoOhA--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3NfbGVnbztmaT1maWxsO2g9ODY7cT03NTt3PTEzMA--/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/US-AFPRelax/istock_60907556.5cefa110622.original.jpg" width="130" height="86" alt="The protective effect of this new compound was observed up to 100 days post-treatment." align="left" title="The protective effect of this new compound was observed up to 100 days post-treatment." border="0" /></a>Researchers based in the USA have developed a compound that may prevent the development of epilepsy. After being tested on mice, the compound could soon be brought to human trials. Scientists from Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center have developed a compound that blocks the hyper-excitability of neurons in epileptic mice.</p><br clear="all"/>

Human tests start on controversial Brazil cancer pill
<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/human-tests-start-controversial-brazil-cancer-pill-220912463.html"><img src="http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/FMKlwUBrXPDWlfzeexWaWg--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3NfbGVnbztmaT1maWxsO2g9ODY7cT03NTt3PTEzMA--/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/afp.com/Part-PAR-Par7312576-1-1-0.jpg" width="130" height="86" alt="The drug, a synthetic phosphoethanolamine known widely as &quot;the cancer pill,&quot; was beginning testing with 10 patients at the Sao Paulo Cancer Institute" align="left" title="The drug, a synthetic phosphoethanolamine known widely as &quot;the cancer pill,&quot; was beginning testing with 10 patients at the Sao Paulo Cancer Institute" border="0" /></a>Human testing started Monday in Brazil on a controversial anti-cancer medicine that has been distributed in the country for years without having gone through proper trials. The drug, a synthetic phosphoethanolamine known widely as &quot;the cancer pill,&quot; was beginning testing with 10 patients at the Sao Paulo Cancer Institute, the Sao Paulo state health department said. The pill was created by Sao Paulo University professor Gilberto Orivaldo Chierice in the 1990s.</p><br clear="all"/>

Flu vaccine may help keep diabetics out of the hospital
By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - People with diabetes who get the flu vaccine may be less likely to wind up hospitalized for cardiovascular or respiratory problems, a recent study suggests. “The potential impact of influenza vaccine to reduce serious illness and death highlight the importance to renew efforts to ensure that people with diabetes receive the flu vaccine every year,” said lead study author Dr. Eszter Vamos, a public health researcher at Imperial College London. Vamos and colleagues examined seven years of data on almost 125,000 people in England with type 2 diabetes, which is associated with aging and obesity and accounts for most cases of the disease.

Malaria drug may help in cancer fight, early research finds
An off-patent malaria drug could help to destroy cancer cells by making them more susceptible to radiotherapy, according to early work that has prompted British scientists to start a clinical trial. Researchers reported on Monday that atovaquone boosted oxygen levels in tumor cells in mice, making radiotherapy more effective against a range of cancer types, including lung, bowel, brain and head and neck cancer. Cancer cells with low oxygen levels are more difficult to treat with radiotherapy and are more likely to spread to other parts of the body.

Researchers successfully block colon cancer tumor growth
<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/researchers-successfully-block-colon-cancer-tumor-growth-155740907.html"><img src="http://l3.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/BEdSnVo8dvAwZuJwsXG4bg--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3NfbGVnbztmaT1maWxsO2g9ODY7cHhvZmY9NTA7cHlvZmY9MDtxPTc1O3c9MTMw/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/US-AFPRelax/istock_00001781.7e4e0131937.original.jpg" width="130" height="86" alt="Over one million men and women are living with colorectal cancer in the USA." align="left" title="Over one million men and women are living with colorectal cancer in the USA." border="0" /></a>Researchers in the USA have discovered that reducing the amount of the L-glutamine amino acid in the body can block the growth of colorectal cancer tumors in mice. The first clinical trials on humans are due to begin this summer. Recent research has established that cancerous tumors rely on L-glutamine to survive and grow. In this latest study, scientists found that a subset of colorectal cancer cells containing a genetic mutation called PIK3CA -- a commonly occurring mutation in cancer cells -- were particularly high consumers of L-glutamine when growing.</p><br clear="all"/>


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